green certified buildings

The University of Arkansas constructed twenty certified buildings since 2004, totaling 916,116 gross square footage that belongs to certified green buildings, eighteen of which are LEED. This represents 10% of the total campus gross square footage. Over 916,000 GSF of green building space was constructed between FY 2004 and 2018. Additional buildings are scheduled for certification in the future. As depicted in the University of Arkansas Climate Action Plan 2018, buildings on campus contribute to the majority of the campus carbon footprint. Continuing to use third party green building codes to align campus buildings with industry standards will be essential to leading by example. 

buildings map

LEED Certified:

Green Globe Certified:

  • Duncan Avenue Apartments (One Globe)
  • Duncan Avenue Community Center (Two Globes)

In addition to the above, The University of Arkansas has six buildings awaiting LEED certification. Click here for more information on our green certified buildings.

Energy Research

Energy is the foundation of our society. With an ever-growing population, finding more sustainable ways of producing and harnessing energy is paramount. At the University of Arkansas, faculty are busy researching every aspect of energy.

A multidisciplinary team led by Dr. Jamie Hestekin (Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering) has been performing extensive research in the area of biofuel and bio-oil generation. So far, the team has developed a method of converting algae grown in waste water into butanol, a clean and efficient liquid fuel. The team has also performed a LCA on the transformation of woody biomass into high quality bio-oils, increasing efficiency and lowering the environmental impact of the process. Generating biofuels from traditionally wasted materials creates value in a system where there previously was none. This not only eliminates a source of waste, but also creates a product that can be used to power our automobiles in a carbon-neutral way. The University of Arkansas is an ideal place for these research projects to take place, as their findings create value for the waste water from our state’s swine industry and woody-mass waste from Arkansas’ large lumber industry.

In a more futuristic turn, Dr. Shui-Quing “Fisher” Yu, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, is leading a team of researchers in designing new solar cells for Earth and beyond. In a multi-institutional project, University of Arkansas researchers have begun work on a promising new material to create more efficient solar cells and develop the next generation of photovoltaic devices used in space missions. The objective of the project is to develop photovoltaic devices made of silicon-germanium-tin, a powerful semiconductor that has been proven by University of Arkansas researchers to increase efficiency in electronic devices that source, detect and control light. These photovoltaic devices will be integrated into existing solar cells to achieve a more efficient energy yield. The new material should also lower the cost of manufacturing and make the devices more radiation tolerant. This project is one of many of the University of Arkansas’ investigation of the potential uses of silicon-germanium-tin.

In the Chemical Engineering department, researchers are finding ways to convert algae to butanol. Led by Dr. Jamie Hestekin, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering a multidisciplinary team at the University of Arkansas has been performing extensive research in the area of biofuel and bio-oil generation. So far, the team has developed a method of converting algae grown in waste water into butanol, a clean and efficient liquid fuel, as well as performed a LCA on the transformation of woody biomass into high quality bio-oils, increasing efficiency and lowering the environmental impact of the process. Generating biofuels from what are traditionally waste materials creates value in a system where there previously was none. This not only eliminates a source of waste, but creates a product that can be used, in this case, to power our automobiles in a carbon neutral way. The University of Arkansas is an ideal place for these research projects to take place, as their findings create value for the waste water from our state’s swine industry and woody-mass waste from Arkansas’ large lumber industry.

In a more futuristic turn, Dr. Shui-Quing “Fisher” Yu, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, leads a team of researchers in designing new ultra-efficient solar cells for Earth and beyond. In a multi-institutional project, University of Arkansas’ researchers has begun work on a promising new material to create more efficient solar cells and develop the next generation of photovoltaic devices used in space missions. The objective of the project is to develop photovoltaic devices made of silicon-germanium-tin, a powerful semiconductor that has been proven by University of Arkansas researchers to increase efficiency in electronic devices that source, detect and control light. These photovoltaic devices will be integrated into existing solar cells to achieve a more efficient energy yield. The new material should also lower the cost of manufacturing and make the devices more radiation tolerant. This project is one of many of the University of Arkansas’ investigation of the potential uses of silicon-germanium-tin.

City Energy Action Plan

Fayetteville has exhibited leadership in our deliberate pursuit to reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions through numerous city- and community-led programs and projects. In the past, these activities have often been led by the City government, but today they are increasingly being implemented by utility companies, building design professionals, local non-profit groups, and community organizations. In an effort to encourage continued improvements in the Climate and Energy sector, the City has adopted a comprehensive Energy Action Plan.