Sustainability Minor Courses

Click on a course title to show its description and requisites.

Approved special topics classes will be announced on the Upcoming Courses page when they are offered..

Required Courses

 SUST 1103. Foundations of Sustainability (Sp). 3 Hours.

Foundations of Sustainability is an interdisciplinary course to introduce concepts and theories of sustainability at global, regional, and local levels. Emphasis is on four thematic areas of sustainability; social, natural, built and managed systems. The aim is to increase environmental literacy for engagement of sustainability into students' own disciplines.

 SUST 2103. Applications of Sustainability (Fa). 3 Hours.

Applications of Sustainability is an interdisciplinary course introducing data gathering, data analysis or interpretation, and synthesis of data applied to problems in sustainability. Students engage in hands-on, inquiry-based investigation of sustainability issues across four thematic areas: social systems, natural systems, built systems (Architecture and Engineering), and managed systems (Agriculture and Business).

 SUST 4103. Capstone Experience in Sustainability (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

A capstone experience focused on service learning, research learning, or internship in sustainability. Student engagement in community service, research, or relevant work on sustainability through a summer internship or equivalent experience provides opportunities for students to apply sustainability theories and principles learned from prior course work toward advancing sustainability across society. Prerequisite: SUST 1103 and SUST 2103.

Elective Courses

 Natural Systems Tier 1

 BENG 4933. Sustainable Watershed Engineering (Fa). 3 Hours.

Provides students with expertise in using advanced tools in watershed monitoring, assessment, and design. Builds on core competencies in hydrology and hydraulics to allow student to evaluate water used by sector in water management regions; evaluate and quantify water demands by sector with emphasis on irrigation; develop risk-based simulations of hydrologic processes, including precipitation, evapo-transportation, infiltration, runoff, and stream flow; quantify and simulate constituent loading to watersheds using GIS-based models, and understand the applications of these methods in water resource management policy. Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: CVEG 3223 or BENG 4903.

 BIOL 3861L. General Ecology Laboratory (Fa). 1 Hour.

Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 3863.

 BIOL 3863. General Ecology (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Ecological principles and concepts; environmental factors and interactions that determine distribution and abundance of organisms. Prerequisite: 7 hours of biological science.

 BIOL 4154. Biology of Global Change (Sp). 4 Hours.

Covers impact of global change on sustainability and adaptability of biological systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L and junior standing.

 BIOL 4154H. Honors Biology of Global Change (Sp). 4 Hours.

Covers impact of global change on sustainability and adaptability of biological systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L and junior standing.

 BIOL 4174. Conservation Genetics (Sp). 4 Hours.

Covers concepts of biodiversity identification and illustrates how genetic data are generated and analyzed to conserve and restore biological diversity. Corequisite: Lab component and drill. Prerequisite: BIOL 3023, BIOL 3863 and STAT 2023 (or equivalent), and Junior standing.

 CHEM 4283. Energy Conversion and Storage (Even years, Fa). 3 Hours.

Fundamental and applied concepts of energy storage and conversion, with sustainability implications. Chemical reactions (kinetics, thermodynamics, mass transfer), emphasizing oxidation-reduction, electrochemical, and interfacial processes, and impact on performance of fuel and biofuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, and photochemical conversion. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 2564. Prerequisite: CHEM 1103, CHEM 1123, PHYS 2054, PHYS 2074, MATH 2554.

 CSES 3214. Soil Resources and Nutrient Cycles (Odd years, Sp). 4 Hours.

Integration of the fundamental concepts of the biological, chemical, and physical properties of soil systems and their roles in managing soil resources. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 2013 and BIOL 2011L. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2203.

 ENSC 3003. Introduction to Water Science (Sp). 3 Hours.

Properties, occurrence, and description of the types, functions, quality and quantity, potential contaminants, uses, and guiding policies and regulations of the various water resources in the environment. Prerequisite: ENGL 1023 and ENSC 1003 or CHEM 1053 or higher or GEOL 1113 or higher or BIOL 1543.

 ENSC 3103. Plants and Environmental Restoration (Odd years, Fa). 3 Hours.

Selection, establishment, and use of plants to promote soil stabilization, water quality, and wildlife habitat. Principles and practices of managing plants for soil remediation, nutrient and sediment trapping, and restoration of plant communities. Prerequisite: CSES 1203 or HORT 2003 or BIOL 1613.

 ENSC 3221L. Ecosystems Assessment Laboratory (Even years, Fa). 1 Hour.

The purpose of this laboratory is to complement concepts learned in lecture by carrying out experiments that familiarize students with methods used in soil and aquatic ecology. Students will collect samples, analyze and interpret data obtained from soil and water samples. Lab will meet once per week for 3 hours. Corequisite: ENSC 3223.

 ENSC 3223. Ecosystems Assessment (Even years, Fa). 3 Hours.

Application of ecological principles for ESWS majors and college students interested in environmental science. Applications of the basic ecological principles of organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems to gain an appreciation for how large scale patterns in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are influenced by small scale interactions among individuals (microorganisms to invertebrate macrofauna) and between individuals and their local environment. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: ENSC 3221L. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543, CSES 2203, and ENSC 3003.

 ENSC 3263. Environmental Soil and Water Conservation (Even years, Fa). 3 Hours.

Effect of land use on water quality. Major sources of agricultural nonpoint pollutants. Best management practices used to minimize water quality impacts. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2203.

 ENSC 4023. Water Quality (Fa). 3 Hours.

Physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of natural waters (rain, river, lake, soil, ground, etc.). Discussion of water quality parameters such as pH, alkalinity and acidity, redox, hardness, BOD, TSS, etc. Aquatic processes of pollutants and principles of modeling. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L and BIOL 1543 and BIOL1541L.

 ENSC 4263. Environmental Soil Science (Even years, Sp). 3 Hours.

Study of the behavior of pesticides, toxic organic compounds, metals, nutrients, and pathogenic microorganisms in the soil/plant/water continuum. Lecture 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: PHYS 2013 and PHYS 2011L. Prerequisite: CSES 3214.

 GEOS 3043. Sustaining Earth (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Theory and growth of conservation and the wise use of the major natural resources of the United States. This course meets the requirement in conservation for teachers. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

 GEOS 4933. Ancient Forests: Science and Sustainability (Sp). 3 Hours.

Ancient forests preserve beautiful habitat with high ecological integrity. This course will examine the development, spatial distribution, and ongoing destruction of ancient forests worldwide, and how science can contribute to the understanding and sustainable management of these valuable resources.

 Natural Systems Tier 2

 BIOL 1543. Principles of Biology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lecture) (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Principles that unify biology with emphasis on scientific study that demonstrates how all organisms are the product of evolution and are parts of interacting systems from the molecular to the ecosystem level. Corequisite: BIOL 1541L.

 CHEM 1103. University Chemistry I (Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Survey of basic chemical principles designed as an introductory course for science, engineering or agriculture majors. Corequisite: Drill component and CHEM 1101L. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 1203 or higher (or satisfactory performance on the mathematics proficiency exam).

 CHEM 1123. University Chemistry II (ACTS Equivalency = CHEM 1004 Lecture) (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Presents the topics of periodicity, bonding, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, kinetics, and chemical equilibrium in detail. Lecture 3 hours per week. Students who pass the CHEM 1103 Freshman Chemistry Proficiency Exam and enroll in CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L and receive a grade of C or better in these courses will also receive credit for CHEM 1103 and CHEM 1101L. Corequisite: CHEM 1121L and related course component drill section for CHEM 1123. Prerequisite: CHEM 1103 (or CHEM 1213 or satisfactory performance on the chemistry proficiency examination) and MATH 1203 or higher or satisfactory performance on the mathematics proficiency examination.

 CHEM 3603. Organic Chemistry I (Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Lecture 3 hours per week. Primarily for non-majors and B.A. chemistry majors who do not take the CHEM 3703 and CHEM 3702L and CHEM 3713 and CHEM 3712L sequence. Corequisite: CHEM 3601L and related course component drill section for CHEM 3603. Prerequisite: (CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L) or (CHEM 1123H and CHEM 1121M) or (CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1221L) or (CHEM 1133 and CHEM 1131L).

 CHEM 3703. Organic Chemistry I Lecture for Majors (Fa). 3 Hours.

Basic chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Primarily for B.S. and B.A. chemistry majors. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 3702L and related course component drill section for CHEM 3703. Prerequisite: Chemistry major; (CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L) or (CHEM 1123H and CHEM 1121M) or (CHEM 1223 and CHEM 1221L).

 CSES 2201L. Soil Science Laboratory (Fa). 1 Hour.

Field and laboratory exercises related to the study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Laboratory mandatory for all crop management and environmental, soil, and water science majors and optional for others. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: CSES 2203.

 CSES 2203. Soil Science (Fa). 3 Hours.

Origin, classification, and physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Lecture 3 hours, discussion 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: CHEM 1103 or CHEM 1073. This course is cross-listed with AGRN 2203, ENSC 2203.

 ENSC 1003. Environmental Science (Fa). 3 Hours.

Series of lectures and discussions introducing the topic of environmental science including factors related to water, soil, and air quality. May not be taken for natural science credit by students in Fulbright College.

 GEOS 1111L. General Geology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = GEOL 1114 Lab) (Sp, Su, Fa). 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises concerning the identification of rocks and minerals, use of aerial photographs and topographic maps, and several field trips. Pre- or Corequisite: GEOL 1113.

 GEOS 1113. General Geology (ACTS Equivalency = GEOL 1114 Lecture) (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Survey of geological processes and products, and their relationships to landforms, natural resources, living environments and human beings. Lecture 3 hours per week. GEOL 1111L is recommended as a corequisite.

 GEOS 1131L. Environmental Geology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = GEOL 1124 Lab) (Sp). 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises concerning human interactions with the physical environment including the study of earthquakes, volcanoes, flooding, erosion, mass wasting, water supply and contamination, and waste disposal. Prerequisite: GEOL 1113 and GEOL 1111L.

 GEOS 1133. Earth Science (ACTS Equivalency = GEOL 1124 Lecture) (Sp). 3 Hours.

The application of earth science principles and knowledge of problems created by human occupancy and exploitation of the physical environment.

 GEOS 2003. World Regional Geography (ACTS Equivalency = GEOG 2103) (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Survey of problems, development potential, and physical and human resources of the developing and developed world.

 GEOS 3333. Oceanography (Even years, Sp). 3 Hours.

The sea, its landforms; its winds and currents as related to the atmosphere, world climates, and world trade; its basin as avenues for continental drift; its waters as habitat for plant and animal life; its marine and submarine resources as presently and potentially useful to man. Offered as physical science. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

 GEOS 3383. Principles of Landscape Evolution (Fa). 3 Hours.

Examines the role of waves, rivers, wind, and tectonics in shaping and modifying the surface of the earth. Considers the way in which an understanding of landscape processes is essential to the effective solution of environmental problems. Lecture 3 hours. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

 GEOS 4033. Hydrogeology (Sp). 3 Hours.

Occurrence, movement, and interaction of water with geologic and cultural features. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 2043 or MATH 2554, and GEOL 3514.

 GEOS 4053. Geomorphology (Sp). 3 Hours.

Mechanics of landform development. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Several local field trips are required during the semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: GEOL 1113 or GEOL 3002.

 GEOS 4063. Principles of Geochemistry (Fa). 3 Hours.

Introduction to fundamental principles of geochemistry from historic development to modern concepts. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 1121L and CHEM 1123.

 GEOS 4353. Meteorology (Fa). 3 Hours.

Examination of the atmospheric processes that result in multifarious weather systems. Offered as physical science. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

 GEOS 4363. Climatology (Sp). 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of topical climatology followed by a study of regional climatology. Offered as physical science. Prerequisite: GEOL 1133 and/or GEOS 4353.

 GEOS 4413. Principles of Remote Sensing (Fa). 3 Hours.

Fundamental concepts of remote sensing of the environment. Optical, infrared, microwave, LIDAR, and in situ sensor systems are introduced. Remote sensing of vegetation, water, urban landscapes, soils, minerals, and geomorphology is discussed. The course includes laboratory exercises in geomatics software and both remote and in situ sensor system field trips.

 MATH 4163. Dynamic Models in Biology (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Mathematical and computational techniques for developing, executing, and analyzing dynamic models arising in the biological sciences. Both discrete and continuous time models are studied. Applications include population dynamics, cellular dynamics, and the spread of infectious diseases. Prerequisite: MATH 2554. This course is cross-listed with BIOL 4163.

 PHYS 2054. University Physics I (ACTS Equivalency = PHYS 2034) (Sp, Su, Fa). 4 Hours.

Introduction to the principles of mechanics, wave motion, temperature and heat, with calculus. Lecture three hours per week and practicum two hours a week (included in lab component). Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 2554. Corequisite: Lab component.

 PHYS 2074. University Physics II (ACTS Equivalency = PHYS 2044 Lecture) (Sp, Su, Fa). 4 Hours.

Continuation of PHYS 2054. Topics covered include electricity, magnetism, light and geometric optics. Lecture three hours per week and practicum two hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: MATH 2564. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: PHYS 2054.

 Managed Systems Tier 1

 AGEC 3413. Principles of Environmental Economics (Sp). 3 Hours.

An introductory, issues-oriented course in the economics of the environment. The course will focus on what is involved in how society makes decisions about environmental quality. The environmental issues important to the State of Arkansas and the United States will be emphasized. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 or ECON 2023. This course is cross-listed with ENSC 3413.

 AGEC 3413H. Honors Principles of Environmental Economics (Sp). 3 Hours.

An introductory, issues-oriented course in the economics of the environment. The course will focus on what is involved in how society makes decisions about environmental quality. The environmental issues important to the State of Arkansas and the United States will be emphasized. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 or ECON 2023.

 AGEC 3523. Environmental and Natural Resources Law (Even years, Sp). 3 Hours.

Principles of environmental and natural resources law relevant to agriculture, food and the environmental sciences; legal principles relating to regulation of water, air, hazardous substances, land, wildlife, livestock, and water rights. Principles of civil and criminal liabilities and other developing legal and regulatory issues relating to agriculture and natural resources.

 AGED 4003. Issues in Agriculture (Fa). 3 Hours.

Lecture and discussion on local, regional, national and international issues related to agricultural policy, ethics, environment, society, and science. Designed for students with at least six hours of upper division agricultural science courses. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

 BENG 3603. Metrics for Sustainable Agricultural Systems (Fa). 3 Hours.

Analysis of productive agricultural systems necessary to meet expanding demand worldwide for food, feed, fiber and fuel while preserving critical ecosystem services to avoid future catastrophic failures of the biosphere. Characterization of sustainable systems using well-defined metrics, indicators and indices, including reference to sustainability certifications. Metrics for soil, water, atmosphere and biodiversity. Applications in crop and animal production with scales from field to watershed to eco-region. Examining the process and methodologies of integrating metrics into indices to support sustainable supply chain decisions. Discussion of life cycle analyses and current initiatives toward approaching agricultural systems sustainability. Technical course intended for students in agriculture, biology, business, engineering, and environmental sciences.

 CSES 3214. Soil Resources and Nutrient Cycles (Odd years, Sp). 4 Hours.

Integration of the fundamental concepts of the biological, chemical, and physical properties of soil systems and their roles in managing soil resources. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: BIOL 2013 and BIOL 2011L. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2203.

 ECON 3843. Economic Development, Poverty, and the Role of the World Bank and IMF
in Low-Income Countries (Fa). 3 Hours.

Examine theories and patterns of economic development in emerging economies. The role of the World Bank and IMF as multilateral lenders and examination of their success and failures in fostering development. Measures of poverty and inequality and their implications for economic development. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

 ENSC 3103. Plants and Environmental Restoration (Odd years, Fa). 3 Hours.

Selection, establishment, and use of plants to promote soil stabilization, water quality, and wildlife habitat. Principles and practices of managing plants for soil remediation, nutrient and sediment trapping, and restoration of plant communities. Prerequisite: CSES 1203 or HORT 2003 or BIOL 1613.

 ENSC 3223. Ecosystems Assessment (Even years, Fa). 3 Hours.

Application of ecological principles for ESWS majors and college students interested in environmental science. Applications of the basic ecological principles of organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems to gain an appreciation for how large scale patterns in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are influenced by small scale interactions among individuals (microorganisms to invertebrate macrofauna) and between individuals and their local environment. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: ENSC 3221L. Prerequisite: BIOL 1543, CSES 2203, and ENSC 3003.

 ENSC 3263. Environmental Soil and Water Conservation (Even years, Fa). 3 Hours.

Effect of land use on water quality. Major sources of agricultural nonpoint pollutants. Best management practices used to minimize water quality impacts. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CSES 2203.

 ENSC 4023. Water Quality (Fa). 3 Hours.

Physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of natural waters (rain, river, lake, soil, ground, etc.). Discussion of water quality parameters such as pH, alkalinity and acidity, redox, hardness, BOD, TSS, etc. Aquatic processes of pollutants and principles of modeling. Prerequisite: CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L and BIOL 1543 and BIOL1541L.

 ENSC 4263. Environmental Soil Science (Even years, Sp). 3 Hours.

Study of the behavior of pesticides, toxic organic compounds, metals, nutrients, and pathogenic microorganisms in the soil/plant/water continuum. Lecture 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: PHYS 2013 and PHYS 2011L. Prerequisite: CSES 3214.

 HORT 3503. Sustainable and Organic Horticulture (Even years, Fa). 3 Hours.

This course will provide a base of knowledge of the principles and practices of sustainable, organic, and alternative horticulture management systems. The class will review and evaluate topics including soil biological processes (compost, humus and fertility), pest management, alternative farming systems, and organic agriculture. After this foundation information is studied, the class will study applications of sustainable agriculture principles to production systems such as greenhouse vegetable production, ornamental production, fruit production, and landscape and turf management.

 SCMT 4123. Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chain Management (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Explores key sustainability concepts across supply chain functions of supply management, operations, and distribution. Course topics include values-based leadership, globalizing sustainability, marketing sustainability, voluntary product standards and governance, stakeholder engagement, reverse logistics, humanitarian logistics, and transportation. Overall, we will consider the feasibility and role of firms in producing sustainability in global supply chains.

 SCMT 4853. Cross-Sector Collaboration for Sustainability (Sp). 3 Hours.

This course explores how organizations in the three sectors of society work together in value creation by addressing social and environmental problems manifest in global supply chains. Focusing on business and nonprofit organizations, we investigate the forces that bring about and influence these collaborations from practical and theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

 WCOB 3023. Sustainability in Business (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The course focuses on theoretical and practical bases for pursuing sustainability in business and society. Students learn four definitions of sustainability, measured on four axes expressed by: 1987 UN Brundtland Report (intergenerational equity), Triple-play (people, planet, profits), resource sustainability, and economic justice (fair global system of rules, fairly enforced). Prerequisite: Junior standing.

 Managed Systems Tier 2

 AGED 4443. Principles of Technological Change (Odd years, Fa). 3 Hours.

This course introduces a structured approach for dealing with the organizational and human aspects of technology transition, including the key concepts of resistance and change management, organizational change, communications, and processes by which professional change agents influence the introduction, adoption, and diffusion of technological change. This course may be offered as a web-based course. Prerequisite: Junior status.

 AGME 1613. Fundamentals of Agricultural Systems Technology (Fa). 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic physical concepts important in agricultural technical systems: applied mechanics, power and machinery management, structures and electrification, and soil and water conservation. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: AGME 1611L (for AECT Majors).

 CSES 2012. Introduction to Organic Crop Production (Odd years, Sp). 2 Hours.

An introduction to the principles of organic agriculture and ecology and the regulations defining organic production and certification. Additional topics include crop rotations for pest management and for increasing soil organic matter, feeding the soil and plant nutrition, soil health, and green manuring, corporate agriculture and genetically modified organisms.

 CSES 2201L. Soil Science Laboratory (Fa). 1 Hour.

Field and laboratory exercises related to the study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Laboratory mandatory for all crop management and environmental, soil, and water science majors and optional for others. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: CSES 2203.

 CSES 2203. Soil Science (Fa). 3 Hours.

Origin, classification, and physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Lecture 3 hours, discussion 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: CHEM 1103 or CHEM 1073. This course is cross-listed with AGRN 2203, ENSC 2203.

 ENSC 1003. Environmental Science (Fa). 3 Hours.

Series of lectures and discussions introducing the topic of environmental science including factors related to water, soil, and air quality. May not be taken for natural science credit by students in Fulbright College.

 MGMT 4243. Ethics and Corporate Responsibility (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

A comprehensive and critical examination of traditional and current ethical theories and approaches that guide business decision-making, ethical issues that affect business decisions, and ethics related to the various business disciplines.

 Built Systems Tier 1

 BENG 3653. Global Bio-Energy Engineering (Fa). 3 Hours.

Global energy sources with a focus on renewable energy, solar and biomass derived fuels. Biomass energy production from crops and organic residues or waste products. Conversion of biomass to usable fuels. Utilization of renewable energy in society. Includes detailed systems analyses to examine inputs, efficiencies, usable outputs and by-products. Systems design to select and integrate components which meet client needs while maximizing sustainable global impacts. Three hours of lecture per week. Pre- or Corequisite: BENG 2643 and (MEEG 2403 or CHEG 2313).

 BENG 4663. Sustainable Biosystems Designs (Sp). 3 Hours.

Process and methodologies associated with measuring, assessing, and designing sustainable systems in water, energy and food. Quantitatively rigorous methodology for life cycle analysis (LCA) for inventory, assessment and impact analyses. Use of other systems analyses and process control theory to evaluate and design sustainable systems. Application of the methods to a project to gain experience in defining, quantifying and utilizing sustainable metrics. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: BENG 3653 and BENG 4743 and BENG 4933.

 CVEG 3243. Environmental Engineering (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Introduction to theories and fundamentals of physical, chemical, and biological processes with emphasis on water supply and wastewater collection, transportation, and treatment. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 2584 with a grade of C or better, and CHEM 1113 or CHEM 1103 with a grade of C or better.

 CVEG 4243. Environmental Engineering Design (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Application of physical, biological, and chemical operations and processes to the design of water supply and wastewater treatment systems. Prerequisite: CVEG 3243 with a grade of C or better.

 CVEG 4863. Sustainability in Civil Engineering (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Qualify and quantify the economic, environmental, societal, and engineering drivers behind sustainability in Civil Engineering. Justification of the feasibility and benefits of sustainability in environmental, geotechnical, structural, and transportation engineering through verbal and written communications. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

 GEOS 4383. Hazard and Disaster Assessment, Mitigation, Risk and Policy (Sp). 3 Hours.

Comprehensive introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to natural and environmental hazards and risk. Hazards and disaster assessment, mitigation, and policy are the focus of the class. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

 LARC 4753. Incremental Sprawl Repair (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Exploration of the causes, manifestation and results of suburban sprawl on the built environment. Design and planning strategies linked to landscape, urbanism, policy, transportation, resource-conservation, ecology, and social structures are proposed. Emphasis is placed on combining traditional and cutting edge methods for repairing sprawled cities and regions. Prerequisite: 4th or 5th year student or instructor approval.

 LARC 5043. Landscape Architecture Seminar: Housing as if the Future Matters (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The role of the landscape architect in contemporary society; how this is affected by technological change and awareness of ecological problems. Group discussions, individual research projects, and guest lectures. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.

 LARC 5386. Landscape Architecture Design VIII: Environmental Land Use Planning (Sp). 6 Hours.

Investigation of the relationship between development, stewardship and land use of the regional scale. Natural resource systems, public policies, regional economics, and social contexts inform environmental land use planning and design decisions. Geographic information systems (GIS) used as an analysis tool. Lecture and GIS lab. Prerequisite: LARC 4376 or instructor approval.

 MEEG 4453. Industrial Waste and Energy Management (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Applications of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and electric machinery to the analysis of waste streams and energy consumption for industrial facilities. Current techniques and technologies for waste minimization and energy conservation including energy-consuming systems and processes, utility rate analysis, economic analysis and auditing are taught. Prerequisite: MEEG 4413.

 MEEG 4473. Indoor Environmental Control (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Gives student a thorough understanding of the fundamental theory of air conditioning design for commercial buildings, including calculating heating and cooling loads along with the proper selection and sizing of air conditioning equipment. Prerequisite: MEEG 4413.

 Built Systems Tier 2

 ARCH 2132. Environmental Technology I (Fa). 2 Hours.

Introduces theories and concepts of the building thermal, luminous and sonic environments with focus on solar geometry-shading, climate-thermal stresses, natural ventilation, daylight, sound isolation and noise control. The application of these systems to support the design of an environmentally responsive building and its enclosure is addressed. Corequisite: ARCH 2016 and ARCH 2113. Prerequisite: ARCH 1212.

 ARCH 3134. Building Materials and Assemblies (Fa). 4 Hours.

Focuses in depth on building materials: their history, properties, configuration and use - both traditional and contemporary, in the service of architectural construction; their impact on the expression and form of both the structure and envelope of buildings and spaces. Corequisite: ARCH 3016. Prerequisite: ARCH 2123.

 ARCH 4154. Environmental Technology II and Building Systems (Sp, Fa). 4 Hours.

Theories and concepts of a variety of building environmental controls featuring mechanical systems with related duct layout and controls, indoor air quality, electric lighting, fire safety, transportation, communication, water and waste. Integration of these systems into the overall building design and how systems selection affects building design and energy consumption. Corequisite: ARCH 4016 or ARCH 4026. Prerequisite: ARCH 3134.

 CSCE 4233. Low Power Digital Systems (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The reduction of power consumption is rapidly becoming one of the key issues in digital system design. Traditionally, digital system design has mainly focused on performance and area trade-offs. This course will provide a thorough introduction to digital design for lower consumption at the circuit, logic, and architectural level. Prerequisite: CSCE 2214.

 CVEG 4323. Design of Structural Systems (Sp). 3 Hours.

An overview of the structural design of buildings. Investigates structural design from loading identification through structural analysis and detailing including consideration of fabrication, construction and erection issues. Prerequisite: CVEG 4303 and CVEG 4313.

 GEOS 4073. Urban Geography (Sp). 3 Hours.

Areal patterns of modern urban regions and the focus shaping these patterns. Emphasis is placed on American urban areas and their evolution and functional areas. Field work. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

 GEOS 3543. Geospatial Applications and Information Science (Fa). 3 Hours.

Computer assisted analysis and display of geographic resource data. Course develops the theory behind spatial data analysis techniques, and reinforces the theory with exercises that demonstrate its practical applications. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 3543.

 IDES 3833. Interior Building Systems (Fa). 3 Hours.

A survey course of building systems that addresses the design implications of heating/air conditioning/ventilation, plumbing, power, data/voice/and telecommunications, fire protection, security, and acoustical systems on building interiors. Performance characteristics and sustainable technologies will be addressed. Corequisite: IDES 3805. Prerequisite: IDES 2815.

 TEED 2103. Technology and Society (Fa). 3 Hours.

An examination of the complex relationships between society, values, and technological development in developed and under-developed nations.

 Social Systems Tier 1

 AGEC 3523. Environmental and Natural Resources Law (Even years, Sp). 3 Hours.

Principles of environmental and natural resources law relevant to agriculture, food and the environmental sciences; legal principles relating to regulation of water, air, hazardous substances, land, wildlife, livestock, and water rights. Principles of civil and criminal liabilities and other developing legal and regulatory issues relating to agriculture and natural resources.

 AGEC 4163. Agricultural and Rural Development (Fa). 3 Hours.

Examination of agricultural and rural development issues in less developed countries. Alternative agricultural production systems are compared, development theories examined, and consideration given to the planning and implementation of development programs. Prerequisite: AGEC 1103 (or ECON 2023).

 ANTH 4143. Ecological Anthropology (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Anthropological perspectives on the study of relationships among human populations and their ecosystems.

 CHLP 4553. Environmental Health (Sp). 3 Hours.

An analysis and evaluation of the various environmental factors that influence our health. Causes of problem factors are identified and solutions proposed for improving environmental conditions.

 COMM 4643. Environmental Communication (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Explores how communication is used by individuals, corporations, and governments to shape public debates about environmental issues. Topics include rhetorical strategies, the publics' right to information and input, dispute resolution techniques, advocacy campaigns, and green marketing. Prerequisite: COMM 1233 and COMM 1313 and COMM 2333 or permission of instructor.

 ENGL 4133. Writing Nature (Sp). 3 Hours.

Study of writings about nature, both scientific and literary. Examination of the basis of each author's relationship with (and definition of) the natural world while examining the literary/aesthetic aspects of that experience. Prerequisite: ENGL 1023. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

 ENSC 3933. Environmental Ethics (Odd years, Sp). 3 Hours.

The course addresses ethical questions about nature and the natural environment. Topics of discussion include anthropocentric and biocentric ethics, population control, obligations to future generations, animal rights, moral considerability, Leopold's land ethic, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Lecture/discussions 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ENSC 1003 or PHIL 2003 or PHIL 2103. This course is cross-listed with PHIL 3113.

 GEOS 4693. Environmental Justice (Sp). 3 Hours.

This course deals with the ethical, environmental, legal, economic, and social implications of society's treatment of the poor, the disenfranchised, and minorities who live in the less desirable, deteriorating neighborhoods, communities, and niches of our country. The class integrates science with philosophy, politics, economics, policy, and law, drawing on award-winning films, current news, and case studies.

 GEOS 4693H. Honors Environmental Justice (Sp). 3 Hours.

This course deals with the ethical, environmental, legal, economic, and social implications of society's treatment of the poor, the disenfranchised, and minorities who live in the less desirable, deteriorating neighborhoods, communities, and niches of our country. The class integrates science with philosophy, politics, economics, policy, and law, drawing on award-winning films, current news, and case studies. This course is equivalent to GEOS 4693.

 HIST 4473. Environmental History (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Examines the interactions between human culture and the natural environments: Concepts of nature in the West and elsewhere, dynamics of the Physical Environment, case studies in Regional Environmental History and the Politics of Environmental movements.

 RESM 1023. Recreation and Natural Resources (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

An examination of the use and management of natural resources for outdoor recreation with consideration of multiple use, environmental ethics, risk management, and other current considerations. Several field visits will be required as part of the class, including a weekend outing. Prerequisite: RESM major or RESM minor or by instructor consent.

 RESM 4023. Outdoor Adventure Leadership (Su). 3 Hours.

This course considers the values and scope of outdoor recreation programs, leadership and skill development with practical experience in a wilderness environment. The course will include a canoe trip through the wilderness, and skill training in such areas as orienteering and rock climbing; and leadership development in interpersonal and processing skills. The graduate portion of the class is geared toward leading and trip planning for taking college age and older students into remote areas.

 RSOC 4603. Environmental Sociology (Sp). 3 Hours.

The course provides a social perspective on environmental issues. It examines the linkage between society, ecological systems and the physical environment. It provides conceptual framework(s) for analyzing environmental issues, considers the role of humans in environmental issues, and enhances understanding the complexity of the relationship between societal organization and environmental change. This course is cross-listed with SOCI 4603.

 Social Systems Tier 2

 CHLP 4643. Multicultural Health (Sp). 3 Hours.

Through lecture, discussion, simulations, and case studies, students will develop an appreciation for the cultural traditions and practices of different groups. The importance and implications of these traditions on health outcomes and health status will be examined. Students will also develop skills of cultural competence that are essential for public health practitioners today. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent.

 HIST 3273. Agricultural and Rural History of the United States (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The history of U.S. agriculture from the pre-Columbian period through the twenty-first century. Focuses on the social and economic implications of agricultural development and the changing nature of rural life in the late twentieth century.

 HIST 3323. The West of the Imagination (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The changing image of the American West from the colonial period to the present and how popular impressions have reflected national attitudes and values. Special attention given to the West's portrayal in folklore, literature, art, films, and television.

 HIST 4463. The American Frontier (Odd years, Fa). 3 Hours.

American westward expansion and its influence on national institutions and character. Emphasis on the pioneer family and the frontier's role in shaping American society, culture, economy, and politics. Topics include exploration, the fur trade, the cattle kingdom and the mining, farming, and military frontiers.

 SCWK 3193. Human Diversity and Social Work (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

An introduction to information basic concepts related to human diversity and social work. Provides content on differences and similarities in the experiences, needs, and beliefs of people distinguished by race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental ability, age or national origin. The Live Section of this course is for Social Work Majors and Minors only. The Online Section (901) is open to Non-Social Work Majors. Prerequisite: Social Work major or minor for live sections only. Online sections (901) open to students in other departments.

 SCWK 4093. Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Provides a conceptual framework for knowledge of human behavior and the social environment with a focus on individuals. Social systems, life-course, assets, and resiliency-based approaches are presented. Special attention is given to the impact of discrimination and oppression on the ability to reach or maintain optimal health and well-being. Prerequisite: COMM 1313, PSYC 2003, SOCI 2013, SCWK 2133, and SCWK 3193 and (BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L, or ANTH 1013 and ANTH 1011L).

 SCWK 4103. Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

This course applies the basic framework for creating and organizing knowledge of human behavior and the social environment acquired in HBSE I to the understanding of family, group, organizational, community, and global systems. Attention is given to discrimination, oppression, the impact of technology, and poverty at each system level. Prerequisite: SCWK 4093 and SCWK 4153.

 SOCI 2033. Social Problems (ACTS Equivalency = SOCI 2013) (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Social disorganization, social strains, and deviant behavior, including consideration of war, poverty, ethnic relations, delinquency, drug addiction, mental illness, and population problems.

 SOCI 3193. Race, Class, and Gender in America (Fa). 3 Hours.

Introduction to sociological theories and research on social inequality in the United States. Course focuses on the three prominent lines of social division in this society: class, gender, and race. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013.

 SOCI 3303. Social Data and Analysis (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics with special emphasis on those techniques most commonly used in social research. Corequisite: SOCI 3301L. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013. This course is cross-listed with STAT 3303.